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in public spaces? >> i think very carefully, just as in navigated the relationship with lyndon johnson. he went out of his way to avoid taking a public position opposed to johnson on the war or poverty issues. it was only after a great deal of deliberation, a great deal of time had passed, and when he felt like he could do nothing else other than take a public stance. that is what is going on in the black community today. i think all of us recognize that the energy has to come from the grassroots. that those of us who feel that the president needs to go further, and i think it barack obama were sitting here, he would say, yes, i like to go farther in terms of dealing with these issues of poverty and specific issues of the black community, but he would also say, you have to push me. that does not necessarily come from him deciding which are the greatest party as he has to deal with. just as johnson also said, look, i have a lot of priorities as president. if you love me to deal with is a voting rights issue, as king did in 1964 and 1965, you have to push me. king went out and helped stage t
with lawmakers as lyndon johnson did. >> yeah, far guy who is so smart it really does puzzle me. perhaps jod city or john can answer as to why he just doesn't appreciate the fact that personal relationships matter in politics at every level always have going back to lincoln. look at spielberg's film. 2013 always will. he doesn't do it terribly well, maybe that's why he wants to suggest it doesn't matter. i agree with everything that jodi just said about some of the opportunities. i do think it's worrisome and not just a parochial matter. it's worrisome that they aren't bringing more people in not just because diversity of voices and views helps but some of these people are tired. some of these people-- particularly economic people-- they are spent, charlie. i wish there were -- you had this sense there was an infusion of fresh ideas and fresh blood. not to change views and change him but just to kind of bring more vital toy the tail rather than just get ready for the big fight. senator chuck schumer has a theory to go to al's point that he tells his colleagues which is that because president obam
johnson readily be barry goldwater and richard nixon overwhelming george mcgovern. in each of those elections, one of the candidates failed to capture the spirit of the american voting public. and the winner had the advantage of the weak opponent. franklin roosevelt won his second term, landslide, because of his huge popularity. however, in many more presidential elections, the candidates are in a heated battle to present themselves as the one best capable of serving the country with the winner walking off with the modest majority. it is a customary wisdom that the campaign between the incumbent president and his opponent will be either a referendum on the first term of the president, or a judgment of which candidate will be the better leader. is there really a difference between these two considerations? does not boil down to judging the leadership skill of the incumbent based on his effectiveness during his first term, versus the unknown leadership skills of the challenger? it's easy to point to the national security, or the economic consequences, or consequent impact on the ratin
-in that are tragedies. i mean you have john f. kennedy being killed in dallas and lyndon johnson quickly being sworn in. or when warren harding tied and coolidge sworn in. there are many examples of that. the simplicity of this, the fact that the weather is good. this is important that we remind ourselves today that we are all americans. we're not democrats. we're not republicans. we're not independents. this is our president for a second term >> pelley: there's so many rancor in an election immediately preceding an inauguration and so much rancor as policy gets to be made. inauguration day is a 24-hour period when that all seems to be put away >> one hopes so. we live in these you know, just terrible partisan times right now. but let's put the bickering aside. i think the fun of tomorrow is going to be guessing what's the president going to say? it's going to be 50 years this year of the "i have a dream speech" of martin luther king. 150 years of the emancipation proclamation. they have this historic african-american president. once again he said barack hussein obama today. using his middle name like
of the "wall street journal." joe califano, once an aid to lyndon johnson. taylor branch, author of a new book on race. and james peterson of lehigh university. we'll round it out with the newest brother act in politics, san antonio mayor julian castro and his air, dentical twin, joaquin castro, just elected to congress. that's a big group but there's a lot to talk about on "face the nation." captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news in washington, "face the nation" with bob schieffer. >> and good morning again. we welcome to the broadcast david plouffe, architect of the president's election in 2008, again last year a key adviser in the administration throughout. let me ask you first about the situation in algeria, where this awful terrorist attack took place. we know that there were seven americans at that compound, and the reports are one is dead. do you have any more information on any of the others? >> i don't this morning, bob. obviously, if and when we have additional information, the state department will release that >> and what about this whole state of terrorism now? have we defeated
instead of wanting to be magic johnson, he wants -- >> now the moan is beginning mark. charles schumer of new york, the chairman of the joint committee on inaugural ceremony. >> mr. president, mr. vice president. members of congress, all who are present, and to all who are watching, welcome to the capital and to his celebration of our great democracy. [applause] [cheering] >> this is the 57th inauguration of an american president. and no matter how many times one witnesses this event, it's simplicity, its innate majesty, and most of all, it's meaning, that sacred yet cautious entrusting of power from we the people to our chosen leader, never fails to make one's heart beat faster as it will today with the inauguration of president barack h. obama! [cheering] >> now, we know that we would not be here today where it not for those who stand guard around the world to preserve our freedom. to those in our armed forces, we offer our infinite thanks. for your bravery, your honor, your sacrifice. >> this democracy of ours was forged by intellect argument, by activism and blood. and, above all,
on tonight is at the historic theater. >> bruce johnson is live at the historic landmark. >> reporter: hey guys, first off congratulations to the ravens. a lot of fans inside there and a lot of people glued to their smart phones watching the game as they were partying for barack obama and paying tribute to the late dr. martin luther king. a lot of people inside old enough to remember martin luther king and the 1963 march year of the washington. you want to start an interesting conversation. ask this well-educated well- connected crowd. what was more important, the first time barack obama was elected. first african american president or the fact that he was just real. let's go inside. i want to tell you some of what they had to say. >> reporter: the historic theater was jumping on stage with the kind of jazz they want to improve. >> i want them to leave the president alone. >> reporter: but outside the upscale gathering waited. >> they have a little more power. >> they have supported president barack obama a second time. and their money, their campaign, and their votes. >> mitch mcconnell s
? he said i am very familiar with the literature on second-term overreach. we both loved lyndon johnson. i don't think he ever read two words on second-term overreach. probably should have. but the point is that he is very aware of what has gone before and he knows that if you don't read all these books about previous presidents, previous leaders, really in world history, you're limiting yourself to yore own personal experience and that is pretty bad. >> is there a particular president, doris, with whom this president identifies the most or respects the most? >> well, i think when he first came into office, obviously, lincoln mattered a great deal to him. i mean, in part probably because the emancipation proclamation, the end of slavery, and he's the first african-american president, almost like closing that circle. but i think as his term went on he was reading about franklin roosevelt, teld di roosevelt. i think there's a sense when the problems change the president that you look back to changes as well. otherwise, we historians would be useful if we didn't help other know what i mean
are expected from johnson & johnson, mcdonald's, verizon, procter & gamble. also coming out in tech, apple, ibm, google and microsoft. tuesday, last month sales of existing homes will be out. on friday we get new home sales reports for the month of december. also, by the way, friday is treasury secretary timothy geithner's last day on the job. jack lew takes over from there. finally, fortune magazine releasing the annual list of 100 best companies to work for. search giant google is tops for the fourth year in a row thanks to the 100,000 hours of free massage, employee wellness centers and seven-acre sports complex. pretty good. rounding out the top five are fas, data an his ticks firm, chg health care, and wegman's food market in new york. they're looking to fill more than 65,000 jobs this year. >>> that will do it for us today. thank you so much for joining me. next week i will be reporting from word economic forum in davos, switzerland. we will take you there. each week keep it right here where we are "on the money." have a great weekend.
of earnings season for the fourth quarter. reports are expected from johnson & johnson, mcdonald's, verizon, proctor & gamble. also coming out in tech, apple, ibm, google, and microsoft. tuesday, exisales of existing hs will be out. also by the way, friday is treasury secretary timothy geithner's last day on the job. jack lew takes over from there. >>> finally, "fortune" magazine releasing its annual list of the companies to look for. google was tops thanks to the 100,000 hours of free massage and a seven-acre sports complex. pretty good. rounding out the top five are sas, a data analytics firm, chg health care in salt lake city, the boston consulting group and wegmans food market. 78 of those best companies are looking to fill more than 65,000 jobs this year. that'll do it for us for today. thank you so much for joining me. next week, i'll be reporting from the world economic forum in switzerland where business and political leaders will be gathering to talk global issues. we'll take you there. each week keep it here where we are "on the money." have a great week, everybody. see you again
in the nation's capital with estimates ranging as high as 1.9 million people. until then, lyndon johnson held the record crowd of 1.2 million in 1965. attendance for president obama's second inauguration is projected to be lower than his first. president george w. bush's second inaugural in 2005 drew up to 500,000 people.>> it may be sot before we get the official estimate of the crowd here, certainly not 1.8 million who were here in 2009, but estimates before the inauguration ranged from 600,000 to 800,000 but what we can report to you is that there were a lot of americans in the national mall today who were overjoyed to witness history, inauguration of any president is a remarkable moment in american history. and they were there today, many of them with their children to see these events. the president was inaugurated of course under the -- in the shadow i probably should say, the capitol dome. a fascinating thing about the dome of the capitol, this year is the 150th anniversary of the completion of the capitol dome. something that was mentioned today during the president's inauguration. h
-- johnson says to bush what are you doing here? bush he said, we just want to pay our respects. johnson was advising bush for the next couple of years about whether or not to run for office. johnson's the one who when bush was going to run for the senate he said what's the difference between the house and the senate? he said what's the difference between chicken and chicken salad? can you imagine now a republican congressman from houston going to see off a democratic president out of respect? >> especially mika the inauguration of a newly elected president in your party when everybody is most excited to elbow their way to the front. for george h.w. bush that's a great example. another great example, william f. buckley. he had liberal friends. in fact, he campaigned for liberals that were his friends even though he knew it upset some on the conservative side. for william f. buckley, it wasn't a blood sport. >> to end this block, to counter it just a bit, and i'm sorry but it has the added value of being true, the president does need to reach out.agree. but he has, an
. franklin roosevelt was moved by later movements. lyndon johnson had the civil rights movement. i think we begin with that. this book comes out at a moment when the country sees the power and possibility of occupy, 99%, and how that has shifted. it is still evolving. it has shifted the center of political gravity of our dialogue. the issue has been off the radar for so long. >> roosevelt surfed and harnessed those movements. he used them to get legislation passed to initiate programs. obama is still getting on his wet suit. to read the essay she wrote in 2008, there was a sense of exhibits -- exuberance. you say that hope is not optimism that expects things to turn out well. it seems like he confused those two things. >> i will come back to what i write about in the book. the expectations were so great and high. go back to 2008. the back to the election and year when we are fortunate region were fortunate enough to be living with debates that were not cruel reality shows. every week, there were debates among the democratic candidates. barack obama embodied change. it seemed he brought into
or johnson about the great society. i don't think everything he addressed yesterday was about everything he wanted to legislate, about where he sees the country going, his vision. >> an eye towards history. >> i think that's how he saw the inaugural address and he effectively did it. i think his specific of the next four years is the state of the union and his vision of "i had a cream." >> and what you said in the white house was illuminating. >> while you're drinking, everything i said was illuminating. >> amen. don't you wish that people in the pews could be drinking on those days? even your worst sermon would sound good. >> you described the president as relieved. i think we saw the president saying, what he's wanted to say for 10 years. and republicans as a result, really back on their heels. republicans now may not get anything from this president in the next three clips. this is not a president who's getting ready to cave or to make a deal with them. starting tomorrow, they're going to try to get back on the offensive. tomorrow, they're going to introduce their bill, vote on their bil
, but the last time we took it seriously during the johnson years. that program started in washington. give me two minutes to give you some sense and this audience some sense of what has happened to poverty since 1989. talking specifically about income inequality -- the top 5% of washington, d.c., household -- in the nation's capital in the origination of the world -- the top 5% of households made more than $500,000 on average last year. top 5%. $500,000 on average last year. the bottom 20% made less than $9,500 last year. i'm no economist, but that is a ratio of 54 to one. the district of columbia, the nation's capital, is the worst of all the 50 states in the union. that is what income inequality looks like in the nation's capital. income inequality has increased in 49 of 50 states since 1989. the poverty rate increase in 43 states. most sharply in nevada. ravage of course by the housing bust, and in my home state of indiana, which sought a rise in low-paying jobs. in all 50 states, the richest 20% of households made far greater income gains than any other quintile, up 12% national ly. incom
1965 we saw that shift over to the republican party. they say that in 1965 when president johnson signed the voting rights act, he turned to bill morris' aide and said i believe we have lost the south to the republicans for a very long time. so case in point. we have seen that previously conservative element that was part of the democratic south go to the republican party. changing houses. and at the same time the other shift we're seeing is in the implicit nature of intolerance. so previously we saw explicit intolerance in terms of lynches and poll taxes. but today it's about lazy. it's about being shucking and jiving. and in regards to latinos, it's about being illegal. so we're seeing intolerance repackaged and in a new home. >> well, and i think johnson said we've lost it to the south i think it was 20 years he said we're at 28 now. since he said that. but jonathan, when you look at the fact that -- and you wrote about the general powell's warning. when you look back to 2008, the ugly rhetoric had started. listen to this and watch this. >> our opponent is someone who sees amer
sarah hughes who was summoned to duty aboard air force one with lyndon johnson following a national tragedy, for the fourth time in our nation's history a woman has sworn in either the president or the vice president of the united states. i had a chance to sit down with justice sotomayor this week to talk about her historic moment. >> i was thinking just a couple of days ago if i think back of when i was a kid, which of the two events would have seemed more improbable to me. i realized each one was so far fetched that i couldn't have imagined either. >> supreme court, swearing in the vice president? >> supreme court or swearing in the vice president in front of the nation and the world. >> does it make you anxious? >> anxiety is not the word. >> and you talked to her, soledad, about how she's perceived on the bench. >> yeah. and she's considered to be very tough and she doesn't really mind or care what people have -- have that analysis of how she is on the bench. here's what she told me. >> i think the noblest profession in the world is lawyering and if a lawyer showed up who wasn't
, from johnson & johnson. [ female announcer ] to nurses everywhere, see lioutdoors, or in.ight. transitions® lenses automatically filter just the right amount of light. so you see everything the way it's meant to be seen. maybe even a little better. visit your eyecare professional today to ask about our newest lenses, transitions vantage and transitions xtractive lenses. experience life well lit. ask which transitions adaptive lens is best for you. officeyour business needs...k... at prices that keep you...out of the red. this week get a bonus $15 itunes gift card with any qualifying $75 ink purchase. find thousands of big deals now... at officemax. >>> and good morning to washington, d.c. inauguration prep's underway as the national day of service event is unfolding. live pictures there was ava longoria speaking now at that national day of service. a whole lot of celebrities here in washington. certainly trying to do their part to support the president and, of course, the national day of service which has become a tradition here. hundreds of thousands of people starting
. curriculum deviation, i was fired. i was hired shortly after by the johnson administration. [laughter] my favorite worldwide poet happens to be the irish poet. there are lines many of us learn in school and forget. he said, the best lack all conviction while the worst are full of passionate intensity. we need that passionate intensity on our side, on the side of the poor children in this earth. i beg the president to summon up the courage to give us that voice. if he does not, it would be a terrible betrayal of his role and he will miss an opportunity to leave behind a beautiful legacy in history. it will be his tragedy as well as ours. [applause] >> we are clearly headed to a real debate about austerity. i do not believe austerity is the answer. some people do. there is a big debate in the coming weeks as we get to this debt ceiling debate. talk to me, from your perspective, about this notion of compassionate conservatism. there was a movement 12 years ago to present that as an alternative. what happened to that? >> i would be glad to go down that road but i do not think it is useful. in
, 1969, richard nixon, john f. kennedy in 1961. george h.w. bush in 1989, lyndon johnson from 1965, president jimmy carter in 1977, and we will wrap up the night at 11:00 eastern with president george w. bush speech from 19 -- from 2001. >> i barack hussein obama do solemnly swear that i will execute the office of president of the an ad states faithfully -- >> when chief justice john roberts administered the oath to barack obama on january 20, 2009, there was a major problem. roberts was supposed to say "that i will faithfully execute the office of president of united states. then barack obama stops, paused, smiled, as if to say, "c'mon, man, this is my big day, you got to get this right." unfortunately, he did not get it right, so the very next night in the white house, they did it again. this time roberts used notes which he had not used the first time, and they got it right. >> the history of democracy's big day, monday at 8:00 a.m. part of a three-day holiday "book tv."c-span's >> the house in for a brief protest for a session this afternoon. party leaders have been sounding ou
johnson, was in power. this president has made no secret of his ambition to be the fourth transformative president. and the question is, will he, in his speech today, show a kind of combative nature that led to franklin roosevelt's overreaching and historic change of the politics of the country? >> you see the congressional leaders for the country. steny hoyer, and we just saw them go to the capitol. >> we saw janet napolitano, and security making their way in. you were talking about lincoln in the course of this presidency. i want to pick up the pictures of him because they are among the most startling. he lost 50 pounds. he was about 150 pounds weighing in, at 6'4". >> the picture on the right side, abraham lincoln, only 56 years old. look at those eyes. of course, the lincoln memorial there. martin luther king in the shadow, gave that speech 50 years ago. and there, we see, as you see more -- i think that's katy perry there. >> i believe it is. >> on the steps of the capitol. along with john mayer. we're going to come back. she performed at the kids' concert saturday night. we're goin
was rare. very, very rare. so in lyndon johnson's tenure as majority leader which ended when he was vice president in january of '61, there was one filibuster in his six years. and harry reid's six years, almost 400. that's the contrast. it's gradual. the right to filibuster has been there since the modern senate was there. but it's the perversion of senators that are willing to filibuster anything, any single thing they bring this to bear. >> describe that perversion. >> that perversion is everything from the almost 100 judicial vacancies that you talked about to many examples of recess appointments in the executive branch. we just spent $3 billion on a presidential election and the president's appointees, most of them he makes now are most likely never to get confirmed, unlikely to get debated, certainly unlikely to get discussed and certainly unlikely to serve. >> you want to end the filibuster. what's behind that? >> senator jeff morgan would make it essential that people talk. this is what the american people want. it would encourage debate, it wouldn't push it away. >> what is your
that johnson was asking for all those big things together really helped. >> the end of the iraq war was not marked as a massive occasion in this country when it happened. there was some primetime news programs that didn't cover it the day that it happened, the day that was the end of the war. but people, when you ask them broadly in the country, end up ranking ending the war as president obama's greatest single accomplishment in his first four years. what explains the primacy of that in memory, even as it was buried in the news as we went through it? >> well, go back to the democratic primaries of 2008. what was the biggest issue? barack obama probably became the nominee largely because he was against the war at the beginning. hillary clinton was for it. so people obviously noticed the absence of that. but even more than that, i'm sure you're wiser than i was. but four years ago i could not imagine that anyone who was president could not only have gotten us completely out of this war, but also do so without that government in iraq collapsing, and more so, without an angry domestic b
." conservative columnist peggy noonan of the "wall street journal." joe califano, once an aid to lyndon johnson. taylor branch, author of a new book o
nixon and remember what happened to him. iran-contra for president reagan. >> and lyndon johnson and vietnam war. >> right. >> one of the things we know absolutely for sure is that something is going to go wrong in the second term. >> it always happens. >> always. sometimes you can foresee it, natural disaster, a terrorist attack. it could be who know what is? i think that we're pretty safe in deciding that there's not a sex scandal in the obama family. >> george bush, it was the financial crisis. >> right. >> and katrina. >> and iraq. >> the idea's how they handle it. >> i'm going to go out on a limb. i think the worst may be behind him. he's actually got more momentum going in than most presidents do. his numbers are actually going up. the economy's getting a little bit better. the wars are winding down so he does have a shot but most important thing to say is i think he's found his game. >> if you look at president's popularity, his is low. >> one of the lowest in past 20, 30 years but the numbers moving in the right direction. i think he's found his rhythm, found a way to act
. >> and let's not forget, lyndon johnson and the vietnam war. one of the things we know absolutely for sure, is that something is going to go wrong in the second term. it always does. always. sometimes you can foresee it as it's coming, could be a natural disaster, a terrorist attack, it could be -- who knows what, i think that we're pretty safe in deciding that there's not going to be a sex scandal in the obama family. >> george bush it was the financial crisis. >> exactly. >> but i -- >> katrina. >> and iraq. >> the idea is how they handle it, how they handle it. >> i'm going to go out on a limb. i think the worst may be behind him. he's actually got more momentum going in than most presidents do, his numbers are actually going up. the k34e's getting a little bit better, the wars are winding down, he does have a shot. i think the most important thing i would say is, i think he's found his game. >> you look at his popularity as compared to other presidents, it's relatively low. >> it is. one of the lowest in the past 20, 30 years, the numbers are moving in the right direction. i think he's
was reading a poem, but i was just a kid, but i came to gw in 1964. so i saw the johnson inaugural. it was facing the west front. it was much more intimate and cramped sort of in the back -- excuse me, the east front and then i remember jimmie walker -- jimmy carter walking. >> that was what the secret service called him. >> yes. that created quite a stir in january of '77. in '80 reagan went to the west front because he wanted to look west and that was something and then in 1996 just a personal remembrance i was at georgia brown's eating lunch and i walked out and bill clinton, the great procrastinator, was riding by in his limousine and i saw through the window he was still writing revisions of his second inaugural address, but it's always an extraordinary event and, of course, nobody could forget obama, just the surge, just the enormous, enormous crowds that were unbelievable. so that's kind of a smorgasboard of my ancient memories. e appreciate re a walking the color that you can provide. >> thank you. >> fox 5 political analyst mark plotkin, thanks as always. >>> sports is com
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 86 (some duplicates have been removed)